THE wellbeing impacts of green spaces, the environmental significance of natural landscapes, reduced pollution, flood impact and agricultural jobs were identified in feedback to the City of Whittlesea’s Green Wedge.

More than 60 per cent of land in the City of Whittlesea municipality is Green Wedge.

The Green Wedge includes national parks, forests, reservoirs, significant Aboriginal and European heritage sites and nationally significant plants and animals as well as farms.

The community were last year asked to help shape council’s new 10-year Green Wedge Management Plan 2023–2033, with more than 550 people submitting feedback on what was most valued about the areas and how they should be protected.

At last week’s meeting, council adopted a new Green Wedge Management Plan 2023-2033.

The plan builds on the 84 actions of the previous 10-year Green Wedge Management Plan 2011-2021.

Chair administrator Lydia Wilson said the new plan was shaped by extensive community feedback.

“From our community consultation last year, we know these spaces are not just environmentally significant but provide our community with opportunities to enjoy recreation and leisure time,” she said.

“Council is committed to protecting our Green Wedge, but also updating our plan to ensure we best represent what our community values.”

The Whittlesea Green Wedge will be recognised for its enhanced natural environment and celebrated cultural assets, for providing a productive and diversified economy and ensuring the wellbeing benefits of the space are enjoyed by all.

Ms Wilson said the City of Whittlesea’s traditional owners had also informed the new plan, with a greater focus on the evolving relationship and recognition of the role of living cultural practice.

“Council has considered all feedback and ideas to help us prepare this final plan and we are confident that it captures our community thoughts and wishes in a balanced way,” she said.

To view the new plan, visit engage.whittlesea.vic.gov.au.