The Mayfield Farmhouse was built in the 1850s but recently suffered fire damage. ​

Mernda’s historic 170-year-old Mayfield Farmhouse will be made safer after being damaged by fire late last year.

Whittlesea council approved a planning permit application for the propping up of walls and partial demolition of the heritage-listed Plenty Road property in a staged response to ‘Make Safe’ requirements.

Stage one of the process will see the roof and walls propped up so the building can be inspected, while stage two seeks to partially demolish the farmhouse where it is deemed structurally unsafe.

A thorough investigation of the damaged building and surrounds will be completed before demolition works are approved by council officers.

Stage two will be supervised by heritage architects and structural engineers after the submission of a detailed report and assessment of the damage.

The property was the home of Mernda pioneer Moses Thomas and was in his family for more than 100 years. ​

Mayfield Farmhouse sits within a large heritage lot that includes a dairy and surrounding farm complex.

The historic Berry Lane is located to the south of the site while the remainder of the land surrounding the site is slated to make up part of the future Mernda Town Centre.

With the farmhouse already required to undergo restoration works, the planning permit is only to ensure no further disrepair.

Administrator Lydia Wilson approved the planning permit at last week’s council meeting.

“Clearly, this planning permit is very important to ensure no further disrepair to the Mayfield farmhouse,” she said.

“I note the staged approval process and all stages must be supervised by a qualified heritage architect and on that basis, I approve the planning application.”