A small 11am service took place at the Whittlesea Soldiers Memorial, with just a few people passing by stopping to pay their respects as COVID-19 restrictions forced all public Anzac Day services to be cancelled across Australia. ​

By Evelyn Leckie – 

IT was an Anzac Day like no other in Whittlesea.

Residents woke up to stand on their driveways at dawn to remember the fallen ANZACs, while the Lost Post played by a resident could be heard through the streets.

At 11am on Church Street, two veterans including Whittlesea RSL member Denys Potts played The Last Post, Reveille and National Anthem through an amplifier from the Soldiers Memorial.

“I was disappointed we weren’t able to have a conventional Anzac Day, but the bottom line is we did what we were supposed to do, we honoured the day as best we could,” Mr Potts said.

Cars, buses and a few passers-by paused for a solemn moment to remember the Anzacs during the minute of silence.

“I don’t know how far the sound travelled, but i’m hoping residents close by heard it,” Mr Potts said.

After the three songs were played, the amplifier was promptly packed up and the street fell quiet again.

A Whittlesea florist laid wreaths at the memorial on behalf of donors.

The City of Whittlesea orchestrated a different way of honouring the day by encouraging residents to share photographs of veterans they were connected to, to share on council’s heritage website page.

Council also encouraged residents to tune into the Dawn Service at the Melbourne Shrine of Remembrance via radio, social media or television to reflect.